Routine Inspections

Modified on Mon, 30 Oct 2023 at 03:16 PM

TABLE OF CONTENTS



Why are routines important?


Routine inspections are a crucial aspect of property management for several reasons:

Maintenance and Repairs

  • Identify Issues Early: Regular inspections allow you to catch problems before they escalate, saving you time and money in the long run.

  • Plan for Upgrades: They give you the opportunity to plan for necessary upgrades or routine maintenance.

Tenant Compliance

  • Lease Agreement: Inspections ensure that tenants are complying with the lease terms.

  • Safety Standards: They make sure the property is being kept to the necessary safety and health standards.

Property Value

  • Maintaining Quality: Inspections help maintain the property's overall quality, which is crucial for preserving its market value.

Legal Protection

  • Documentation: In case of legal disputes, having a record of regular inspections can serve as evidence to protect your interests.

Tenant Relationship

  • Communication: Conducting routine inspections provides an opportunity for property managers to interact with tenants, strengthening the landlord-tenant relationship.

Financial Planning

  • Budgeting: Knowing in advance what repairs are needed allows for better financial planning and budgeting.

Insurance

  • Policy Requirements: Some insurance policies may require regular inspections to remain valid.

Regular inspections are a win-win for both the property owner and the tenant, as they ensure the property is well-maintained and any issues are dealt with promptly.

 

Routine inspection timeframes



Routine inspections in Australia can differ by state and territory, as real estate and tenancy laws are not federally regulated but are overseen by each jurisdiction. Here are the general guidelines for the recommended time frames for routine inspections in various Australian states and territories:


New South Wales (NSW)

  • First Inspection: Can occur within the first 3 months of the lease.

  • Subsequent Inspections: Up to 4 times per year.

Victoria (VIC)

  • General Rule: Not more than once every 6 months.

Queensland (QLD)

  • First Inspection: Can occur after the first 3 months.

  • Subsequent Inspections: No more than once every 3 months.

South Australia (SA)

  • General Rule: No more than once every 4 weeks.

Western Australia (WA)

  • First Inspection: Can occur within the first 6 weeks.

  • Subsequent Inspections: Not more than once every 3 months.

Tasmania (TAS)

  • First Inspection: Can occur within the first 3 months.

  • Subsequent Inspections: No more than once every 3 months.

Australian Capital Territory (ACT)

  • General Rule: Not more than twice within any period of 12 months.

Northern Territory (NT)

  • First Inspection: Can occur within the first 3 months.

  • Subsequent Inspections: No more than once every 3 months.

Please note that these are general guidelines and may be subject to change. It's crucial to check the most up-to-date legislation or guidelines for your specific jurisdiction. 

 


Routine inspection notices

The notice requirements for routine inspections can vary by state and territory in Australia, as each has its own legislation governing residential tenancies. Here are the general rules:

New South Wales (NSW)

  • Notice Required: At least 7 days written notice.

Victoria (VIC)

  • Notice Required: At least 24 hours notice. The notice must be in writing and specify the day of entry, which must be between 8 am and 6 pm.

Queensland (QLD)

  • Notice Required: Entry notice (Form 9) must be given at least 7 days before the inspection.

South Australia (SA)

  • Notice Required: At least 7 to 14 days written notice.

Western Australia (WA)

  • Notice Required: Typically, between 7 to 14 days notice is required. The notice must be in writing.

Tasmania (TAS)

  • Notice Required: At least 24 hours notice. The notice must specify the reason for entry and propose two reasonable times of entry between 8 am and 6 pm.

Australian Capital Territory (ACT)

  • Notice Required: At least 7 days written notice. The notice must specify the day and time range (of up to 2 hours) for the inspection.

Northern Territory (NT)

  • Notice Required: At least 7 days notice. The notice must specify the date and time of the inspection.

Please note that these are general guidelines, and the specifics can vary, including exceptions or additional requirements like the mode of delivering the notice (e.g., email, post, hand delivery). It's essential to consult the most current regulations for each jurisdiction to ensure compliance.


How to manage routines

When creating a tenancy record in the @realty CRM, the first Routine Inspection is automatically added 3 months after the Lease Start Date. 

When you are ready to inspect the property you will need to use the Inspection Manager tool. To learn how to conduct the inspection using Inspection Manager, click HERE and HERE.


If you have not used Inspection Manager before, you can learn about the platform here.




Also, it is recommended that you create a dummy routine inspection time so you can familiarise yourself with the tool, but do not send the report to your landlord.

Once you have completed your Inspection, you will need to go back to the Tenancy Record in the @realty CRM and click on the tick button for that routine 


Then add the Inspection Report and Mark the Inspection as Completed.


The Inspection Report will be added to the bottom of the documents list in the Tenancy Record and you will be able to add another Inspection time by clicking on the button in the Inspections section




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